Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

The Front by Patricia Cornwell (♦♦♦)

Massachusetts District Attorney Monique Lamont is an ambitious woman with a painful, recent past. Her newest initiative is oriented towards rescuing neighborhoods from crime; for that purpose, she has decided to raise public awareness by reviving a cold case involving the brutal killing of a blind British young woman in Watertown, 1962.

Lamont orders Winston “Win” Garano, a state police investigator, to investigate the old crime in the company of Stump, a female police detective who heads a coalition of police agencies called the FRONT, which has the objective of uniting resources to avoid dependency of the state police. Stump makes clear from the beginning that she doesn’t want to be a part of the investigation; furthermore, she is convinced that Lamont has a secret agenda, and she may be right. When Garano starts to probe, he realizes that nothing is what it seems, and that Lamont, Stump and other characters all have their own reasons to lie.

I liked this book for several reasons: it is well written, and it is rather short (180 pages). The plot is compelling, but the end doesn’t live up to the rest of the story; it is a pity, though, because most of the book is compulsively readable.