Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

Mozart’s Sister (Nannerl, la soeur de Mozart) (♦♦♦♦)

Nannerl (Marie Féret), Mozart’s fourteen year-old sister, lives in her famous younger brother’s shadow because she is a girl. She too possesses innate musical talent. Despite the love that keeps the family together, Nannerl resents the devotion that her father, Leopold, reserves for the younger sibling. In Wolfgang (David Moreau), Leopold (Marc Barbé) sees his own dreams of fame likely to come true.

While touring with her family, her carriage breaks an axle and they’re forced to stop at a convent where luckily they meet three of France’s King Louis XV’s daughters. One of the girls, Louise, takes an instant liking for Nannerl, making her a confidant.

Louise and Nannerl’s friendship soon extends to France’s dauphin, Louis, who is mourning for the death of his wife at childbirth. Nannerl and Louis form an unlikely bond based on their mutual liking of classical music. Soon enough, Nannerl comes to the realization that she can make a living on her own teaching music and composing for wealthy patrons, but reality intrudes when her platonic affair with the dauphin is interrupted by Louis’ engagement.

This French movie is a work of art. It is wonderfully acted and full of emotions as only great art can elicit. Mozart’s performance is overshadowed by Nannerl and her parents’, but it is after all Nannerl’s life story. The musical score is fantastic, and so is the European setting of the movie.

Wonderful and delicate film!