Circe by Madeline Miller (♦♦♦♦)

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Granddaughter of Oceanus, daughter of Titan Helios and sea nymph Perseid, Circe was different from the start. While her siblings discovered their unique gifts very early on and gained their independence—either by claiming their inheritance, like Perses and Aëstes, or by marriage to a wealthy demigod, like Pasiphäe—, Circe remained among her family in the halls of the gods. Her love for young fisherman Glaucus changed everything. Circe used a potion to transform Glaucus into a worthy suitor. Glaucus, seeing his station changed, fell in love with one Circe’s cousins, a sea nymph named Scylla. Out of jealousy, Circe put a potion on Scylla’s bath and, unintendedly, transformed her into a monster. Circe’s confession forced Helios to go to see Zeus, for witchcraft is something that gods fear can tip the balance of power. Zeus declared an eternal banishment for Circe from the halls of the gods to the island of Aiaia.

Exile was not easy but, as Circe learned, it had its advantages; being away f…

Anonymous (♦♦♦½)

This film puts forth the theory that the literary work of William Shakespeare was penned by nobleman Earl of Oxford and given to a lesser known author for profit in exchange for his discretion regarding the provenance of the manuscripts. Groomed to succeed Elizabeth I as monarch of England, the Earl of Oxford committed two sins as a youth: wrote poetry, which was considered seditious, and he engaged in an illicit affair with the queen despite himself being married to the daughter of Elizabeth’s state counselor. A child was conceived by the lovers, but their romance was doomed due to state affairs.

Despite having a great premise, I found the story rather confusing, at least the political subplot. The theory involving the true origins of Shakespeare is rather tantalizing.

Good movie but confusing, better to be watched on DVD.

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