Snapshots - #42: Thor: Ragnarok, Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool, LBJ

Image
Thor: Ragnarok (2017), (♦♦♦♦½): Thor has saved earth twice by now and has, for the last two years, wandered the universe searching for infinity stones. He hasn't found any. He has, however, become prisoner of an enemy of Asgard, Surtur, who tells Thor that his visions of Asgard engulfed in flames is a premonition of Ragnarok—the destruction of Asgard, which is already in motion. Thor frees himself and arrives at home to find Loki sitting on the throne, passing as Odin, and neglecting his duties to protect the Nine Realms. With Odin's exile, Asgard's enemies have been reassembling, but Odin's death may just free Hela, a goddess against whom neither Thor nor Loki are enough.
It was in Thor: The Dark World where Loki, an antagonist, first threatened to steal the show. He became the villain that Marvel fandom loves to hate. While Loki is at his most charming in this film, the director, with the help of a sparkling screenplay, has very much exploited the great chemistry of t…

J. Edgar (♦♦♦♦)

J. Edgar chronicles the beginnings of the FBI from the fight against communist radicals in the 1920s and 1930s until Hoover’s death in the 1970s. From his point of view, Edgar Hoover describes his relationship with his mother, his devotion to his career, his power struggles with politicians of the era, and his lifelong relationship with Clyde Tolson, the second man in the FBI.

A major faux pas in this movie is the rather ghastly makeup applied to the aging characters of Hoover, his secretary and Mr. Tolson. However, if one overlooks that flaw and focuses on the acting, then one is up for a real treat. Leonardo DiCaprio delivers his best performance yet, and Armie Hammer is equally amazing as his lover-friend. Judi Dench and Naomi Watts have minor roles but fundamental in J. Edgar’s life: Hoover’s controlling mother and his loyal secretary.

The much discussed and anticipated kissing scene between DiCaprio and Hammer is rather minor and, in my opinion doesn’t justify the hype. The movie does a great job at portraying the characters in all his human complexities despite of what the audience may or may not think.

Leonardo DiCaprio became J. Edgar, and for that alone, this movie is worth watching.

Comments