Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

J. Edgar (♦♦♦♦)

J. Edgar chronicles the beginnings of the FBI from the fight against communist radicals in the 1920s and 1930s until Hoover’s death in the 1970s. From his point of view, Edgar Hoover describes his relationship with his mother, his devotion to his career, his power struggles with politicians of the era, and his lifelong relationship with Clyde Tolson, the second man in the FBI.

A major faux pas in this movie is the rather ghastly makeup applied to the aging characters of Hoover, his secretary and Mr. Tolson. However, if one overlooks that flaw and focuses on the acting, then one is up for a real treat. Leonardo DiCaprio delivers his best performance yet, and Armie Hammer is equally amazing as his lover-friend. Judi Dench and Naomi Watts have minor roles but fundamental in J. Edgar’s life: Hoover’s controlling mother and his loyal secretary.

The much discussed and anticipated kissing scene between DiCaprio and Hammer is rather minor and, in my opinion doesn’t justify the hype. The movie does a great job at portraying the characters in all his human complexities despite of what the audience may or may not think.

Leonardo DiCaprio became J. Edgar, and for that alone, this movie is worth watching.