Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

A Dangerous Method (♦♦♦)

Directed by David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises, A History of Violence), A Dangerous Method explores the personal relationship and professional rivalry between prominent psychologists Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender), the father of psychoanalysis, and Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen).

With the method that Freud pioneered, Jung treats Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), a very disturbed Russian patient who dreams of becoming a doctor herself. Once Jung cures Sabina, they become lovers. Years later, already become a psychologist, Spielrein sides with Freud, who by that point has ended his personal relationship with Carl Jung.

This movie is well acted by all three leading characters, being food for the mind since the audience is treated with dissertations on psychology’s most important theories of the era.

There are scenes of physical punishment during sex, but aside from that, the film lacks action which makes it feel extremely slow despite running for only 99 minutes. Besides, the discussions between the characters feel more like a lecture on psychology.