Snapshots - #42: Thor: Ragnarok, Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool, LBJ

Image
Thor: Ragnarok (2017), (♦♦♦♦½): Thor has saved earth twice by now and has, for the last two years, wandered the universe searching for infinity stones. He hasn't found any. He has, however, become prisoner of an enemy of Asgard, Surtur, who tells Thor that his visions of Asgard engulfed in flames is a premonition of Ragnarok—the destruction of Asgard, which is already in motion. Thor frees himself and arrives at home to find Loki sitting on the throne, passing as Odin, and neglecting his duties to protect the Nine Realms. With Odin's exile, Asgard's enemies have been reassembling, but Odin's death may just free Hela, a goddess against whom neither Thor nor Loki are enough.
It was in Thor: The Dark World where Loki, an antagonist, first threatened to steal the show. He became the villain that Marvel fandom loves to hate. While Loki is at his most charming in this film, the director, with the help of a sparkling screenplay, has very much exploited the great chemistry of t…

A Dangerous Method (♦♦♦)

Directed by David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises, A History of Violence), A Dangerous Method explores the personal relationship and professional rivalry between prominent psychologists Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender), the father of psychoanalysis, and Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen).

With the method that Freud pioneered, Jung treats Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), a very disturbed Russian patient who dreams of becoming a doctor herself. Once Jung cures Sabina, they become lovers. Years later, already become a psychologist, Spielrein sides with Freud, who by that point has ended his personal relationship with Carl Jung.

This movie is well acted by all three leading characters, being food for the mind since the audience is treated with dissertations on psychology’s most important theories of the era.

There are scenes of physical punishment during sex, but aside from that, the film lacks action which makes it feel extremely slow despite running for only 99 minutes. Besides, the discussions between the characters feel more like a lecture on psychology.

Comments