Snapshots - #42: Thor: Ragnarok, Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool, LBJ

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Thor: Ragnarok (2017), (♦♦♦♦½): Thor has saved earth twice by now and has, for the last two years, wandered the universe searching for infinity stones. He hasn't found any. He has, however, become prisoner of an enemy of Asgard, Surtur, who tells Thor that his visions of Asgard engulfed in flames is a premonition of Ragnarok—the destruction of Asgard, which is already in motion. Thor frees himself and arrives at home to find Loki sitting on the throne, passing as Odin, and neglecting his duties to protect the Nine Realms. With Odin's exile, Asgard's enemies have been reassembling, but Odin's death may just free Hela, a goddess against whom neither Thor nor Loki are enough.
It was in Thor: The Dark World where Loki, an antagonist, first threatened to steal the show. He became the villain that Marvel fandom loves to hate. While Loki is at his most charming in this film, the director, with the help of a sparkling screenplay, has very much exploited the great chemistry of t…

Daughters of Isis by June L. White (♦♦)

Cousins Samantha, Alexandria and Megana are descendants of Queen Cleopatra and protected ever since by the Goddess Isis. It was prophesized by the goddess that three female descendants of Cleopatra were going to fight a great evil and make the land holy again, all during a spring solstice. Sam, Alex and Meg are the chosen females, who are to be aided by three males, descendants of the Medjai Society of Protectors of the Goddess Isis. These protectors since Cleopatra’s time have married their protégés and fought together against evil forces aiming to control the world.

I didn’t like this book. First, it is poorly written. The author switches back and forth between verbal tenses in the same sentence and it’s difficult to know whether the action is past or present. Second, the book is full of grammatical errors and poor word choices. There are some books that readers who are non-native English speakers can read out loud and even if the word is wrong you know what the author meant, this is not such a book. Third, there is no character development. White talks about how Sam, Alex and Meg fell in love with Jon, Hank and Steve, respectively, but in the book there’s no context, only that they went to live together in the same house and next thing you know they’re getting married.

Good book premise with disappointing development.

Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of Daughters of Isis by June L. White as a member of the Dorrance Publishing Book Review Team. Visit dorrancebookstore.com to learn how you can become a member of the Book Review Team.

Dorrance Publishing

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