Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

Daughters of Isis by June L. White (♦♦)

Cousins Samantha, Alexandria and Megana are descendants of Queen Cleopatra and protected ever since by the Goddess Isis. It was prophesized by the goddess that three female descendants of Cleopatra were going to fight a great evil and make the land holy again, all during a spring solstice. Sam, Alex and Meg are the chosen females, who are to be aided by three males, descendants of the Medjai Society of Protectors of the Goddess Isis. These protectors since Cleopatra’s time have married their protégés and fought together against evil forces aiming to control the world.

I didn’t like this book. First, it is poorly written. The author switches back and forth between verbal tenses in the same sentence and it’s difficult to know whether the action is past or present. Second, the book is full of grammatical errors and poor word choices. There are some books that readers who are non-native English speakers can read out loud and even if the word is wrong you know what the author meant, this is not such a book. Third, there is no character development. White talks about how Sam, Alex and Meg fell in love with Jon, Hank and Steve, respectively, but in the book there’s no context, only that they went to live together in the same house and next thing you know they’re getting married.

Good book premise with disappointing development.

Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of Daughters of Isis by June L. White as a member of the Dorrance Publishing Book Review Team. Visit to learn how you can become a member of the Book Review Team.

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