Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

My Week with Marilyn (♦♦♦♦)

In 1956, during the filming of The Prince and the Showgirl, Marilyn Monroe charmed Colin Clark, a third assistant director in the production. As a consequence, the dynamics of the relationship that ensued are explored, as well as her interaction with her co-star and director Lawrence Olivier and the rest of the cast.

If with Blue Valentine Michelle Williams earned a well deserved Oscar nomination, My Week with Marilyn certainly consecrates her as a screen royalty. Michelle Williams not only physically resembles Marilyn Monroe, but displays her charming screen persona as if possessed by Marilyn herself.

Williams, with the help of an amazing script, successfully manages to portray Marilyn in all her human complexities: as a magnetic actress able to command the cameras at will, but also as a drug addict and insecure belle, who thanks to a neglected childhood needed all the adulation in the world to feel wanted and noticed.

Also noteworthy is the acting of supporting characters key to the story such as Kenneth Branagh as Lawrence Olivier, who successfully conveyed the frustration and awe that a fellow actor must have felt for Marilyn Monroe; Judi Dench, an acting heavyweight always with Oscar worthy performances, Emma Watson, as a costume assistant already stepping out of the Harry Potter’s shadow, and especially good is Eddie Redmayne (The Pillars of the Earth, The Good Shepherd) as Colin Clark, the man who falls in love with Marilyn Monroe and ends up brokenhearted.