Circe by Madeline Miller (♦♦♦♦)

Image
Granddaughter of Oceanus, daughter of Titan Helios and sea nymph Perseid, Circe was different from the start. While her siblings discovered their unique gifts very early on and gained their independence—either by claiming their inheritance, like Perses and Aëstes, or by marriage to a wealthy demigod, like Pasiphäe—, Circe remained among her family in the halls of the gods. Her love for young fisherman Glaucus changed everything. Circe used a potion to transform Glaucus into a worthy suitor. Glaucus, seeing his station changed, fell in love with one Circe’s cousins, a sea nymph named Scylla. Out of jealousy, Circe put a potion on Scylla’s bath and, unintendedly, transformed her into a monster. Circe’s confession forced Helios to go to see Zeus, for witchcraft is something that gods fear can tip the balance of power. Zeus declared an eternal banishment for Circe from the halls of the gods to the island of Aiaia.

Exile was not easy but, as Circe learned, it had its advantages; being away f…

Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows (♦♦♦)

Professor Moriarty, an evil genius and Holmes’ nemesis, has been planting bombs all around Europe to cover up the assassinations of arms industrialists. The idea is to force the fighting of nation against nation to create demand for weapons and Moriarty would then supply them. Sherlock Holmes figures out as much and has the fight of his life against Moriarty, all to save Europe from war.

This second Sherlock Holmes installment is darker than the first, both in humor and plot. Unfortunately, it also feels long and somewhat convoluted. I had a hard time following the story and it has been eons since I read the books, so I had to rely on the movie.

There is good acting by the entire cast and there are humorous moments throughout, but not enough to call it a fun time at the movies.

Comments