Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

The Artist (♦♦♦♦)

George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is the major star of a movie studio in Hollywood during the silent era. A chance encounter of Valentin with an aspiring actress named Peppy Miller (Bérénice Bejo) catapults her to instant celebrity status. With the advent of talking films, George Valentin becomes obsolete while Miller becomes the next “it” girl.

Meanwhile, the stock market crashes triggering the Great Depression and George Valentin loses his fortune falling on hard times. A new opportunity for Valentin in the movie business is handed down by Miller, who never stopped loving him.

While I don’t think this is a Wow movie, I did enjoy it very much. This is a silent movie from beginning to end; the product is nothing short of amazing. This is a delicate film in which acting, followed by a climatic musical score, plays a central role to deliver the story.

I have the opinion that an actor must be quite good to act in a silent film, because he/she has to convey his/her emotions using mimic. Many of today’s actors would have been lost portraying George Valentin and Peppy Miller in The Artist; fortunately, Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo perform effortlessly and win our hearts in the process.

Jean Dujardin has a masculine appeal that reminds me of Omar Shariff, and he acts with the same emotional abandon.