Circe by Madeline Miller (♦♦♦♦)

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Granddaughter of Oceanus, daughter of Titan Helios and sea nymph Perseid, Circe was different from the start. While her siblings discovered their unique gifts very early on and gained their independence—either by claiming their inheritance, like Perses and Aëstes, or by marriage to a wealthy demigod, like Pasiphäe—, Circe remained among her family in the halls of the gods. Her love for young fisherman Glaucus changed everything. Circe used a potion to transform Glaucus into a worthy suitor. Glaucus, seeing his station changed, fell in love with one Circe’s cousins, a sea nymph named Scylla. Out of jealousy, Circe put a potion on Scylla’s bath and, unintendedly, transformed her into a monster. Circe’s confession forced Helios to go to see Zeus, for witchcraft is something that gods fear can tip the balance of power. Zeus declared an eternal banishment for Circe from the halls of the gods to the island of Aiaia.

Exile was not easy but, as Circe learned, it had its advantages; being away f…

Chronicle (♦♦♦)

Andrew is a high school kid who has recently bought an expensive video camera with which he documents everything. Out in the woods, Andrew, his cousin Matt and his friend Steve go into an underground cave where they come upon something odd. In the days following the incident in the cave, they discover they have developed telekinesis abilities. At first is all very cool because Andrew becomes a popular kid due to his new found superpower, but Andrew’s father is abusive, triggering rages that make Andrew capable of really awful things.

We as audience enjoy superhero movies so much, but this is the one side that is never explored. People are capable of doing good and bad stuff, but superhero powers magnify personality traits already present, as we are reminded so often in movies like Spiderman and Captain America. Is it a pretty side of power? It’s not, but it’s worth exploring.

This movie is certainly not a classic, but it’s definitely worth watching if only as a cautionary tale.

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