Circe by Madeline Miller (♦♦♦♦)

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Granddaughter of Oceanus, daughter of Titan Helios and sea nymph Perseid, Circe was different from the start. While her siblings discovered their unique gifts very early on and gained their independence—either by claiming their inheritance, like Perses and Aëstes, or by marriage to a wealthy demigod, like Pasiphäe—, Circe remained among her family in the halls of the gods. Her love for young fisherman Glaucus changed everything. Circe used a potion to transform Glaucus into a worthy suitor. Glaucus, seeing his station changed, fell in love with one Circe’s cousins, a sea nymph named Scylla. Out of jealousy, Circe put a potion on Scylla’s bath and, unintendedly, transformed her into a monster. Circe’s confession forced Helios to go to see Zeus, for witchcraft is something that gods fear can tip the balance of power. Zeus declared an eternal banishment for Circe from the halls of the gods to the island of Aiaia.

Exile was not easy but, as Circe learned, it had its advantages; being away f…

The Iron Lady (♦♦♦♦)

This biopic chronicles the beginnings of Margaret Thatcher, as the proud daughter of a small business owner, as Oxford graduate and her marriage to Dennis Thatcher. Thatcher, as a senile woman, reminisces on her political career, her highs and lows as Britain’s Prime Minister and her clash with her political party that led her to resign from office.

I have read some reviews expressing how this is Not a political movie. I strongly disagree. This movie is very much about Margaret Thatcher the woman as it is about her politics, her rise and fall as a politician and the ideals who shaped her. It is impossible to talk about Margaret Thatcher’s life divorced from politics; doing so is simply deny her impact in her country’s political times.

The Iron Lady chronicles Margaret Thatcher’s clashes with unions, who were demanding high salary increases for unionized workers of up to 35%!, the middle class discontent with her economic changes, her strong stance towards IRA’s terrorism, the war she was forced to fight to recover the Falkland Islands from Argentina’s Junta’s illegal intervention and the collapse of socialism in eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. Through all those convulse events, her leadership shone brighter, Great Britain grew stronger.

Enough with what the movie is about. Meryl Streep’s performance is stirring, the best of her career in my opinion. Streep moves like a breeze from senility and hallucinations to a powerful, sound minded politician contending with friends and foes alike.

This 2012 Award Season has been all about Viola Davis, but in my opinion it belongs to Meryl Streep, unlike other many times. This was the year to consecrate her with the status she rightly deserves as Hollywood royalty, no that she needs it.

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