Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

Mirror Mirror (2012) (♦♦♦♦)

Snow White lives in a castle with her stepmother the queen, but on her eighteenth birthday Snow crashes a queen’s party in the palace and instead she gets a glimpse of the queen’s ill feelings towards her.

During an incursion to the Dark Forest, which is inhabited by “giants” and a beast, Snow gets to save two gentlemen who have been tied together (half naked) by rogues. Little does Snow know that one of the gentlemen she helped is a prince.

Snow and Prince Alcott meet again that night at the palace during a dance ball. They fall for each other, but the queen--threatened by Snow’s beauty and her possible, rightful claim to the throne-- banishes Snow from the palace and sends her loyal servant Brighton to kill Snow and bring back proof of her death. As you may expect, Brighton doesn’t kill Snow, instead he sets her free in the forest. Snow is rescued by seven dwarves-thieves and her adventures begin.

I really loved this movie. It pokes fun at aging (gracefully or otherwise), at beauty, at people who have married multiple times, at suffering… The humor, however, is oriented towards adults.

Julia Roberts is stellar as the wicked queen, Lilly Collins is the perfect embodiment of Snow White and Armie Hammer is enchanting as Prince Alcott. Nathan Lane is funny as Brighton, the queen’s loyal servant, and the “giant dwarves” are simply adorable.

The costumes are bright, colorful and lavish. The parties are grand and so are the scenarios.

In summary, Snow White is a fun, lush and just plain cute movie for the whole family.