Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

The Snow Kimono by Mark Henshaw (♦♦♦♦)

Tadashi Omura, Law Professor with Tokyo University, is on a trip to Paris. Over the course of five months he sustains conversations with his neighbor, former police Inspector Auguste Jovert, about the life of Omura’s lifelong friend, Katsuo Ikeda. As months go by and the story turns more intricate and personal, Omura and Jovert begin to realize how deeply connected all of us are.

Mark Henshaw has received many awards over the course of his writing career, that made me want to read his latest novel The Snow Kimono.

The Snow Kimono is not only poetic, it's hypnotizing. It is a plot centric novel and best read without knowing much because the official blurb can be misleading, and it almost ruined my reading experience. You know how there are certain books that if you stop reading for a while the connection is lost? This isn't one of those books. I was a willing captive. Staccato sentences mimic faulty memory, and though I wasn't a fan throughout, it grew on me.

The Snow Kimono has all the ingredients of a Greek tragedy, and a timeless feel, despite the action unfolding circa 1950s or 1960s in Japan. Vintage storytelling gives The Snow Kimono the feel of a modern classic, and in my opinion, it deserves to be one.

DISCLAIMER: I received from the publisher a free Galley of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.


  1. I'm not familiar with this writer but the book sounds fascinating.

    1. I was not familiar with him either, Dorothy, but his first novel was Australia's best selling novel in a decade. I learned of this book via a promotional email from NetGalley, and yes, it is fascinating, though it takes time to unfold but it's definitely worth it.


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