Far from the Madding Crowd (♦♦♦♦)

England, 1870.
Bathsheba Everdene is a young woman with only her education to pride herself, but upon the death of an uncle she inherits money, a mansion, and a farm on several acres of land. Working on her farm is Gabriel Oak, the first man she refused to marry. He accompanies her through life's ups and downs, her whirlwind romance to spirited sergeant Frank Troy which ends up in a failed marriage, and another truncated marriage offer from her land neighbor and middle aged bachelor Mr. Bolwood.

I love period pieces and romantic movies and Far from the Madding Crowd doesn't disappoint on any front. The acting is superb; the photography, musical score, and cinematography are simply beautiful. This movie has soul and a moral: enduring love grows from partnership and sacrifice; it isn't born from infatuation, but from every day acts.

I like Carey Mulligan's acting style, because she can conjure at will different characters such as the innocent girl in An Education, the vain and pretty Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby, the heartbroken and ever expectant lover in Never Let Me Go, or the strong headed Bathsheba in Far from the Madding Crowd. Mulligan also has a good instinct about the roles she chooses; thus far she has avoided being typecast.

Cast:
Carey Mulligan (Bathsheba Everdene), Matthias Schoenaerts (shepherd Gabriel Oak, first suitor), Michael Sheen (Mr. Bolwood, second suitor), Tom Sturridge (Sergeant Frank Troy, Bathsheba's husband), Juno Temple (Fanny Robbin, Frank Troy’s paramour)

Comments

  1. Have you read the book? It's long been on my list of classics that I want to read. Maybe I'll get to it one of these days.

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    1. You know, I always seem to see the movies and not know about the books they are based on. I think I've read just few books before they were movies.

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  2. I loved the 1967 version of this. The book is one of my favorite Thomas Hardy books. Just added this to my Netflix queue.

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    1. This version is very well made, Judy. I guess I'll have to watch now the 1967 version since you loved it and compare.

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    2. Because Julie Christie is so great in it!

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    3. I saw the movie last night. Loved it! Carey Mulligan is wonderful and Mattias for me has so much sex appeal. I forgot that Bathsheba's last name was Everdene. Suzanne Collins has said that she named Katniss after Bathsheba because the book was an early influence on her of independent spirited women who came from limited means!

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    4. I know; they were great together, weren't they?
      That's a good piece of trivia. I wouldn't have thought of associating the two.

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  3. I loved the novel and would definitely like to watch this film.

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    1. I definitely think you would enjoy it, Jessica, and it counts towards your adaptations reviews. ;-)

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  4. I thought this film was really good too. Definitely a good adaptation to sit down to - I suppose it helped that the shepherd guy was quite easy on the eye.... just saying!
    Lynn :D

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    1. Hahaha... He was definitely easy on the eye. I may have liked him more than I did the movie. ;-)

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  5. I agree, Carey Mulligan usually does a great job in her roles. I'm glad you liked this one and I plan to rent it too.

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    1. Yes, she is great in the roles she takes. This one was sweet but not overly so, just the right amount to be romantic.

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