Snapshots - #37: It, Breathe, Mark Felt – The Man Who Brought Down the White House

It (2017), (♦♦♦♦): Four inseparable friends in middle school bond with other three newcomers. They all have in common that they are bullied by the same people. Over the course of one summer they'll fend off bullies and face a centuries-old demon in the form of a clown, named Pennywise, whom has been disappearing kids and terrorizing the town of Derry, Maine, every twenty-seven years since the town was founded.
Based on Stephen King's novel of the same title, It is a movie with a smart script and a sympathetic ensemble of nerds that deliver light humor, and deep thrills. It doesn't hurt that each and every character has his or her own arc, thus one gets to know their motivations and fears before Pennywise enters head on into the picture.
In a nod to 1980s movie classics such as The Goonies, and the Brat Pack ensemble, the newest adaptation of It takes place at the end of that decade, when it seems, at least from the Hollywood perspective, that every kid harbored a genius insi…

Avenger by Frederick Forsyth (♦♦♦♦)

I could never do justice to Frederick Forsyth in summarizing his plots. The following blurb of Avenger has been taken from Barnes & Noble:

Attorney Calvin Dexter hangs his shingle in a quiet New Jersey town, has a reasonably successful practice, and takes the hills strong while triathlon training. But Dexter is no ordinary man.

The summer before he goes to college, Ricky Colenso travels to Bosnia to volunteer as an aid worker. A few weeks later, he disappears and is never heard from again. A family grieves and is offered little hope—in the fog of that horrible time and place, the killer, too, has vanished.

Or so it would seem. For in a world that has forgotten right and wrong, there are few like Cal Dexter who can settle the score. And so, years later, a worldwide chase is on and Dexter begins to draw a net around the killer. But this time CIA agent Paul Devereux must find a way to stop Dexter before his quest for vengeance throws the world into chaos.

Avenger has a more modern feel than some of Forsyth's earlier works I have read, such as The Fourth Protocol and The Fist of God. While the latter two have a very complex structure of storytelling, Avenger is an easier to read and to follow, though still multi-layered, thriller gem.

I never stop marveling at Forsyth's talent for spinning a great story, particularly one which does both, entertain and inform the reader at the same time. Forsyth talks about conflagrations the world over and several countries' political intricacies (i.e., the four Guyanas) with the depth of a master. In Avenger, he covers the Vietnam War, Cambodia, and the Serbo-Croatian conflict in painstaking detail. The result is a very polished work of fiction that will make you wonder repetitively, what if...

The ending is as intriguing as it is surprising.


  1. This sounds very interesting - I don't think I've read any Forsyth before - I shall go and check him out.
    Also, - I've just nominated you for a 'neat' blogger award. I know these things are very time consuming though so no pressure to take part and no offence taken whatsoever - I'm just nosey and like to ask questions!
    Lynn :D

    1. He writes great stuff. You should check him out.
      Thanks for the award, Lynn 😃; I will pass by tomorrow to get the questions and complete them.

  2. Sounds intriguing. I might have to give it a try.

    1. It is an intriguing novel, Dorothy; I think you would like it.

  3. I agree with Dorothy. Sounds intriguing especially with the Bosnian War angle.

  4. I like the fast action thrillers for summer. I can't recall if I've read any of Forsyth's or just Ludlum's. It's been awhile.

    1. Forsyth is magnificent, though his thrillers aren't fast action; they slow simmer to a climax, but what a ride they are.


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